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Godpod and theological resources

I have had a great evening listening to a whole stack of theological podcasts from St Paul's Theological Centre, London, UK. There are over 60 podcasts available from the St Paul's website or on iTunes that cover a whole range of topics in Christian ethics, spirituality, systematic theology, history, Christian biography etc.with experts from across UK.

The format is pretty simple: a three way discussion between Dr Jane Williams, Revd Dr Mike Lloyd, Revd Dr Graham Tomlin and a special guest or two each session (I've listenind to Prof. Nigel Biggar, Prof. NT Wright, Dr David Hilborn, Prof. Andrew Walker, Prof. Alister McGrath, and a hosts of others so far). Each lasts a bit less than an hour, but there's plenty to think about and chew over. If you're looking for some really good input, and some fun theological discussion from leading evangelical thinkers, then head over to St Paul's Centre and their Godpod page.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Hi, I am from Australia.

Please find some references which point out that the never-ending babble/babel of theologians has nothing to do with Truth, and that theologians have never ever been the source of the Process that IS True Religion.

http://www.beezone.com/up/spiritualadeptsrootreligion.html

http://www.adidam.org/teaching/aletheon/truth-god.aspx

http://www.dabase.org/dht7.htm

http://www.dabase.org/tfrbkyml.htm

http://www.beezone.com/AdiDa/not_elsewhere.html
Anonymous - thanks for the links. I wonder why youdidnt leave your name: it seems strange addressing someone as "Anonymous"?

Anyway, I guess you know what I'm going to say: we shall agree to disagree, I hope. I have no idea what gives you such confidence that you can know what the True Religion is, that you are so anti men and women who spend their lives thinking about these things. I suppose a flippant retort might be that your statements are themselves a form of theology -- does that make you a theologian, and are you now babbling/babeling on? But I want to steer away from flippancy. On a serious note, true religion as I see it is relationship with the living God who is Father Son and Holy Spirit. I agree with you that no theologian is the source of that: God only is the source of that relationship, and mediates it to us in Jesus Christ. But I suspect that's not really your bag either. I hope and pray that one day it might be.

All friendly wishes from UK to you and yours in Oz,
Michael

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