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An Introduction to the Theology of Karl Barth: Reformierte Sommer-Universitat 2011

I recently came across information about the Reformierte Sommer-Universitat project in Germany. It seems to be a series of seminars on Reformed Theology hosted by the Protestant theology faculty at the University of Muenster in conjunction with the Dutch Theological University at Apeldoorn. This year the theme of one of the seminars has been "An Introduction to the Theology of Karl Barth" and features Michael Beintker (Muenster), along with Gerard den Hertog (Apeldoorn), and Konrad Hammann (Muenster).

For the benefit of those who speak German, you can view Michael Beintker's lecture, "dialectical beginnings: the development of the theology of the Word of God", here. You can also download the video too, for a more leisurely listen. Michael Beintker is a world class Barth scholar, and well worth listening to. Hopefully other lectures will come online soon.

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